Filtering by: HISTORY

Cuba: Post-Castro Transition
May
16
12:00 PM12:00

Cuba: Post-Castro Transition

In April, Miguel Díaz-Canel became the 19th President of Cuba and the first in over 40 years who was not a member of the Castro family. This appointment—not election—of a new Cuban president raises a number of important questions about the future and stability of the regime. In a post-Castro era, Cuban politics will likely change, though the direction and magnitude of those changes remains to be seen.

On May 16, Hudson Institute will host a panel to explore these issues and discuss the possibility of a democratic transition on the island.

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Understanding Secessionist Struggle in South Asia
May
14
11:00 AM11:00

Understanding Secessionist Struggle in South Asia

Since 1945, much of the world’s conflict has been separatist in nature. South Asia is especially prone to such disputes. At this event, Dr. Ahsan Butt, drawing on his new book, Secession and Security: Explaining State Strategy Against Separatists, will argue that it is states, rather than separatists, that determine how much violence there is in these conflicts. He will highlight the various strategies, ranging from negotiated concessions to large-scale repression, adopted by states in response to separatist movements. Dr. Butt’s deep historical approach focuses on two main cases—Pakistani reactions to Bengali and Baluch demands for independence in the 1970s, and India’s responses to secessionist movements in Kashmir, Punjab, and Assam in the 1980s and 1990s. His presentation will also relate his research to the current situations in Kashmir and Baluchistan.

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The Rise and Fall of the ABM Treaty: Missile Defense and the U.S.-Russia Relationship
Feb
7
3:30 PM15:30

The Rise and Fall of the ABM Treaty: Missile Defense and the U.S.-Russia Relationship

CSIS is hosting a discussion to explore how the U.S.-Russia relationship has for decades shaped the development and deployment of ballistic missile defenses. This discussion will feature Dr. James Cameron, whose new book The Double Game (2017) examines the complicated motivations and reservations of the American presidents who negotiated the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with the Soviet Union.

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Winning the Third World: The Sino-American Rivalry
Dec
4
11:00 AM11:00

Winning the Third World: The Sino-American Rivalry

In his new book Winning the Third World, Gregg Brazinsky illuminates the competition between the United States and China in 21st-century Asia and Africa by analyzing the Sino-American rivalry during the Cold War. Foreign Affairs has called the book “Essential reading for anyone interested in the future of U.S.-Chinese relations.” CSIS is hosting an event for a discussion with the author.

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Book Discussion: Russia's Border Wars and Frozen Conflicts
Nov
15
4:00 PM16:00

Book Discussion: Russia's Border Wars and Frozen Conflicts

Russia's Border Wars and Frozen Conflicts examines the origins and execution of Russian military and political activities in Moldova, Georgia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan. Using a realist perspective, Dr. James J. Coyle concludes that there are substantial similarities in the four case studies: Russian support for minority separatist movements, conflict, Russian intervention as peacekeepers, Russian control over the diplomatic process to prevent resolution of the conflict, and a perpetuation of Russian presence in the area. Dr. Coyle places the conflicts in the context of international law and nationalism theory.

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The Diplomacy of Decolonization: United Nations Peacekeeping during the Congo Crisis, 1960-1964
Oct
17
12:30 PM12:30

The Diplomacy of Decolonization: United Nations Peacekeeping during the Congo Crisis, 1960-1964

The Stimson Center and United Nations Association of the National Capital Area (UNA-NCA) are hosting a discussion with Alanna O'Malley, author of the forthcoming book, The Diplomacy of Decolonisation, America, Britain and the United Nations during the Congo crisis, 1960-64.

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Libya: Past and Present
Oct
6
3:00 PM15:00

Libya: Past and Present

Understanding today’s Libyans—and helping them find a better future—depends upon a sound understanding of the divisions and conflicts of the past. Dr. Federica Fasanotti will discuss Libya’s current traumas in the context of its troubled history. Join CSIS for a discussion with one of the world’s leading historians and analysts of modern Libya.

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Weighing Bad Options: Past Diplomacy With North Korea and Alliance Options Today
Sep
18
2:00 PM14:00

Weighing Bad Options: Past Diplomacy With North Korea and Alliance Options Today

The Carnegie Endowment will host two veteran diplomats deeply involved with the last set of intense negotiations with North Korea who will discuss their experiences and consider options in light of today’s dynamics, and will be joined by both U.S. and Japanese experts. Carnegie’s Jim Schoff will moderate.

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The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World
Sep
12
12:15 PM12:15

The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World

On a summer afternoon in 1928, world leaders assembled in Paris to outlaw war. Within a year, the treaty signed that day, known as the Peace Pact, was ratified by nearly every state in the world. War, for the first time in history, had become illegal. Within a decade, the states that signed the pact were again at war, and as a result many dismissed the pact as folly. 

In their new book The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World, Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro argue that this dismissal was mistaken, and that the pact ushered in a sustained march towards peace. While doing so, they tell the history of how the pact came to be and of the lawyers, politicians, and intellectuals whose ideas have shaped our understanding of war’s role in a just world order. 

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Sixteen Years After 9/11: Assessing the Terrorist Threat
Sep
11
12:15 PM12:15

Sixteen Years After 9/11: Assessing the Terrorist Threat

Sixteen years have passed since the attacks of 9/11, and three presidents have now wrestled with calibrating an effective American response to the threat of jihadist terrorism. Where does the terrorist threat stand today? How effective has the Trump administration been in confronting the threat? What will the threat look like tomorrow? 

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Gone but not forgotten: migrants, mothers and the missing
Aug
30
6:00 AM06:00

Gone but not forgotten: migrants, mothers and the missing

In honor of the International Day of the Disappeared, the ICRC is convening a conference at the Humanitarium on the importance of remembrance and the story behind its origins. Although the world is changing, our responsibility towards missing people and their families remains the same. How can we best help responsible authorities meet the needs of those who go missing and their families? And how do these needs change when the missing person is deceased? The conference is part of the ICRC's conference cycle on generating respect for the law.

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The True Ambitions of Russian Foreign Policy Today
Aug
8
5:00 PM17:00

The True Ambitions of Russian Foreign Policy Today

Russian foreign policy objectives are poorly understood today. This is because most analysts look at Russia through Western eyes. But, Russia is not only Moscow. Russia is Siberia and the Far East also. This lecture hosted by the Institute of World Politics will provide a three-dimensional view of Russia, it will contextualize Russian actions over the past decade beyond the headlines, and it will illustrate why U.S. foreign policy toward Russia is misguided (and how to correct the strategic misperceptions).

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Media Diplomacy: Challenging the Indo-Pak Narrative
Jul
24
3:00 PM15:00

Media Diplomacy: Challenging the Indo-Pak Narrative

The dominant national narratives in India and Pakistan fuel tensions between the two nations. Journalists and social media users play a critical role in crafting hostile public opinions and inciting further animosity. Atlantic Council is hosting a conversation to discuss the influence of media on public perception in India and Pakistan.

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Nicaragua: A Renewal of Russian Influence
Jul
13
4:00 PM16:00

Nicaragua: A Renewal of Russian Influence

This event co-hosted by the IWP Student Speakers Series and the Center for Intermarium Studies at IWP will provide an overview of Nicaragua, the history of Nicaraguan-Soviet relations, including the political, economic and military support that the Soviet Union provided the Sandinista government in its rise to power, the reemergence of Nicaragua's relationship with the Kremlin, and how this relationship parallels the one with the Soviet Union.

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The United States and Armenia at Twenty-Five
Jun
27
10:00 AM10:00

The United States and Armenia at Twenty-Five

  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, in cooperation with the Embassy of Armenia, is hosting a conversation with five former and current ambassadors—three American and two Armenian—on U.S.-Armenian ties over the past twenty-five years. The ambassadors will focus on the dynamics of the bilateral relationship and the regional challenges from both historical and contemporary perspectives

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Women Guiding Peace After War: Lessons from Rwanda
Jun
26
3:00 PM15:00

Women Guiding Peace After War: Lessons from Rwanda

The pivotal role of women after the Rwandan genocide offers a powerful model of peaceful change and lasting security. How they contributed to this transformation holds lessons for other countries in conflict, including nearby South Sudan, and aid donors such as the United States. The U.S. Institute of Peace and the organization Inclusive Security are hosting a discussion on Rwanda’s transition from genocide to a country at peace, where women hold 64 percent of seats in parliament.

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The Western Balkans: A Delicate Balance
Jun
26
10:30 AM10:30

The Western Balkans: A Delicate Balance

The collapse of Yugoslavia twenty-six years ago unleashed brutal wars and a humanitarian catastrophe. Today, the delicate order in the Balkans is threatened yet again. The Wilson Center is hosting experts and academics to discuss the challenges in the Western Balkans and the policy options for preserving the region’s fragile order and recovery.

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The Forgotten Flight: Terrorism, Diplomacy and the Pursuit of Justice
Jun
19
11:00 AM11:00

The Forgotten Flight: Terrorism, Diplomacy and the Pursuit of Justice

On 19 September 1989, 170 people were killed when French Airlines UTA Flight 772 was destroyed by a suitcase bomb while en route from Chad to Paris. As a lawyer, Stuart H. Newberger represented the families of the seven Americans killed in the UTA 772 attack. Now he brings all the pieces together to tell the story of the tradegy for the first time, revealing in riveting prose how French investigators cracked the case and taking us inside the courtroom to witness the litigation against the Libyan state that followed. In the age of globalization, The Forgotten Flight provides a fascinating insight into the pursuit of justice across international borders.

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LBJ and the June 1967 War: Lessons from the American Role
Jun
1
12:30 PM12:30

LBJ and the June 1967 War: Lessons from the American Role

  • The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

U.S. policy -- and especially U.S. guarantees -- played a critical role in the run-up to the 1967 war, an aspect that is often overlooked in frequent debates about occupation, settlements, and terrorism. To commemorate a conflict whose ramifications still resonate throughout the region, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy is hosting a forum looking back on the lessons of America's role in that seismic historical event.

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Oppose Any Foe: The Rise of America’s Special Operations Forces
May
17
11:00 AM11:00

Oppose Any Foe: The Rise of America’s Special Operations Forces

Highlighting both the heroism of America's most elite soldiers and the controversies surrounding their growth, The Heritage Foundation will host author of Oppose Any Foe who will present the first comprehensive history of the U.S. special forces and their daring missions.

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Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War
Apr
6
10:00 AM10:00

Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War

  • Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This exhibition examines this form of artistic expression from two complementary perspectives: one, professional artists who were recruited by the U.S. Army; the other, soldiers who created artwork. Together they shed light on World War I in a compelling and very human way.

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Space Law at 50: Past, Present and Future
Mar
30
2:00 PM14:00

Space Law at 50: Past, Present and Future

Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) Steven M. Schneebaum International Law Society and SAIS International Law and Organizations Program will host a conference on space law. It will bring together academic and practical perspectives of the development of space law, and allow academics and practitioner in the front of the field to exchange their views.

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