Filtering by: CULTURE

Pakistan Elections: What Now?
Aug
8
9:30 AM09:30

Pakistan Elections: What Now?

To discuss the outcome of the elections in Pakistan, the shape of the next government, and the complaints and challenges to the outcome, USIP will hold a conversation with senior representatives from Pakistan’s top three political parties (PTI, PML-N and the Pakistan Peoples Party) via Skype along with experts Daniel Markey, Kiran Pervez and Moeed Yusuf. Join the conversation on Twitter with #PkElectionsWhatNow.

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The Economic Impact of Fighting Corruption in Guatemala
Aug
7
10:30 AM10:30

The Economic Impact of Fighting Corruption in Guatemala

CSIS is hosting a discussion on the economic impact of fighting corruption in Guatemala. The event will launch a report entitled The Economic and Fiscal Impact of the Fight Against Corruption in Guatemala, published by the Central American Institute for Fiscal Studies (ICEFI). The study describes the connection between the Central American region's recent economic slowdown and national corruption, and debunks the erroneous argument that the fight against corruption is costly to the economy. 

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Technology, National Identity, and “Invisible Countries”
Jun
26
7:00 PM19:00

Technology, National Identity, and “Invisible Countries”

In his new book Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood, journalist Joshua Keating explores complex zones of identity and statehood. He brings us self-proclaimed countries—think Kurdistan, Somaliland, Abkhazia—that force us to question our conception of nationhood and suggest that our lengthy period of cartographical stasis may be coming to a head. New America is hosting Joshua for a conversation at New State Books with international tech policy analyst Miranda Bogen, and moderator Ishaan Tharoor of the Washington Post on how we’ll define nationhood in the future.

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Bet You Didn’t See That One Coming: Obama, Trump, and the End of Washington’s Regular Order
Jun
21
12:00 PM12:00

Bet You Didn’t See That One Coming: Obama, Trump, and the End of Washington’s Regular Order

The 24/7 media circus that follows President Trump distracts from the fundamental issue of what his election means for America going forward. Bet You Didn’t See That One Coming explains how Barack Obama’s progressive policies helped ignite the ultimate anti-Obama political warrior – and how a neophyte politician’s new blend of populism, nationalism, and traditional Republican policies is pulling a polarized country back toward the right. The Honorable Robert Ehrlich and Edwin J. Feulner will discuss at the Heritage Foundation.

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Countering Violent Extremism: Learning from African-American Muslim Experiences
Mar
27
11:30 AM11:30

Countering Violent Extremism: Learning from African-American Muslim Experiences

To discuss the specific CVE experience of African American Muslims and the example of the CWDM (Community of Imam W. Deen Muhammad), New America is hosting Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, co-author of Transforming the Hate that Hate Produced, a new report on the subject, director of Quilliam North America, and a former counterterrorism analyst with over a decade of experience at the Department of Homeland Security, National Counterterrorism Center, and Office of the Director of National Intelligence. New America also welcomes Yaya Fanusie, Director of Analysis at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies’ Center on Sanctions and Illicit Finance and a former CIA analyst and Imam Talib Shareef, President and Imam of the “Nations Mosque” Masjid Muhammad. 

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Living Proof: Documenting the Human Toll of Climate Change
Mar
21
12:00 PM12:00

Living Proof: Documenting the Human Toll of Climate Change

The Wilson Center is hosting a screening and discussion of two short films from the GroundTruth Project’s Living Proof series—“A Climate for Conflict” and “Breadwinner”— that grapple with the social instability associated with environmental change and the far-reaching impact of women’s empowerment. The filmmaker, Beth Murphy, will discuss the links between climate, conflict, and gender with Marcus King, an academic expert on environmental conflict, and a leading advocate, A. Tianna Scozzaro from the Sierra Club.

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‘Last Men in Aleppo’
Feb
21
7:00 PM19:00

‘Last Men in Aleppo’

The Center for American Progress’ Reel Progress program and Grasshopper Film are co-hosting a screening of the Oscar-nominated documentary “Last Men in Aleppo.” The screening will be followed by a short panel featuring the film’s director, Feras Fayyad—the first Syrian filmmaker to be nominated for an Oscar—along with the Center for American Progress’ Brian Katulis, Council on Foreign Relations’ Steven Cook, and Al Arabiya’s Nadia Bilbassy-Charters.

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Changing Patterns of Extremism and Terrorism in Pakistan
Feb
13
2:30 PM14:30

Changing Patterns of Extremism and Terrorism in Pakistan

This event, which is co-hosted with The Wilson Center and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, will highlight current developments and perceptions in Pakistan related to extremism and terrorism; examine the role of state and society in radicalization and extremism; discuss possible future trajectories of extremism and terrorism in Pakistan; and consider what this all means for U.S. policy.  

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Religion and Countering Violent Extremism
Jan
17
9:00 AM09:00

Religion and Countering Violent Extremism

USIP is hosting a discussion of the latest trends in policy and practice around the intersection of religion and its role in preventing and countering violent extremism. A panel of experts will present and discuss practical guidelines around the role of religion in preventing and countering violent extremism. 

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The View of the U.S. from Abroad: A Conversation with International Ambassadors
Jan
16
5:30 PM17:30

The View of the U.S. from Abroad: A Conversation with International Ambassadors

CSIS is hosting a "Smart Women, Smart Power" discussion with international ambassadors currently serving as their countries' representatives in Washington. The conversation will focus on the view of America from abroad, U.S. policies, and current global issues

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The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy & Propaganda
Dec
8
6:00 PM18:00

The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy & Propaganda

The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy and Propaganda, co-authored by Christopher C. Harmon and Randall G. Bowdish and published by Brookings Institution Press, is an entirely original study of the strategic communications of violent sub-state actors. The book exposes the surprising range of different media now in use by terrorists, including writing books and setting up television stations. It provides insights, observations, and conclusions reached in 9 case studies of media—of groups as different as secular Iranian dissidents, Islamists of ISIS and Al Qaeda, Filipino Maoists, and Irish militants.

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The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy and Propaganda
Dec
8
12:00 PM12:00

The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy and Propaganda

The Heritage Foundation is hosting a conversation with Christopher Harmon, coauthor with Randall Bowdish of the forthcoming book, The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy and Propaganda. The discussion will revolve around how armed groups have used communications techniques with varying degrees of success.

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Saria’s story: Life as a Syrian refugee
Dec
6
3:00 PM15:00

Saria’s story: Life as a Syrian refugee

Brookings is hosting Saria Samakie, an amateur photographer and Syrian refugee, in conversation with Brookings Nonresident Senior Fellow and former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Samakie and Duncan will candidly discuss what it is like to be a Syrian refugee in America today. What were some of the fierce challenges that Samakie—and no doubt countless other refugees—experienced during his journey? What does he make of life as an American university student? And what would he like all Americans to know about his country and his story?

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Talks @ Pulitzer: Helen Epstein on Conflict In Central Africa
Dec
4
5:30 PM17:30

Talks @ Pulitzer: Helen Epstein on Conflict In Central Africa

The next Talks @ Pulitzer conversation in Washington, D.C. is with journalist Helen Epstein about her recently published book, "Another Fine Mess: America, Uganda and the War on Terror." Joining Epstein for the evening is Lawrence Kiwanuka Nsereko who grew up in Uganda. Nsereko is an editor, journalist, democracy activist, former child soldier, and the inspiration for "Another Fine Mess." 

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Book Launch: Digital World War
Dec
1
1:30 PM13:30

Book Launch: Digital World War

Social media has reshaped the way societies engage in politics and war across the Muslim world. From ISIS’ use of social media to recruit to its role in the Arab Spring the Internet has become a site of conflict. In his new book, Haroon Ullah examines the unprecedented impact of social media across the region addressing both its democratic revolutionary impact as well as how it has been co-opted by religious conservatives and extremists. 

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Putting Sectarianism in Perspective
Nov
21
3:00 PM15:00

Putting Sectarianism in Perspective

The Middle East Institute is hosting a conversation with Nader Hashemi and Danny Postel, editors of the new book Sectarianization: Mapping the New Politics of the Middle East. Their book critiques the reliance on religious identity as the explanation for the region's violence, and analyzes the ways in which geopolitical rivalries or domestic grievances have become, or been mobilized into, sectarian wars. How, Hashemi and Postel ask, can the region's politics be "de-sectarianized"?

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Religion and Foreign Policy: Exploring the Legacy of "Mixed Blessings"
Nov
13
2:00 PM14:00

Religion and Foreign Policy: Exploring the Legacy of "Mixed Blessings"

The Human Rights Initiative (HRI) and Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs are hosting a discussion marking the 10th anniversary of CSIS’s groundbreaking report, "Mixed Blessings: U.S. Government Engagement with Religion in Conflict-Prone Settings". This report analyzed how religion affects international affairs, including through the faith and religious beliefs of politicians and elites; the belief structures that underlie national and international views; and the impact of religious organizations. At this event, Shaun Casey, former director of the U.S. Department of State’s Office of Religion and Global Affairs, will interview Liora Danan, lead author of Mixed Blessings and former chief of staff for the Office of Religion and Global Affairs, to discuss the report's goals and relevance in diplomacy today. Following their interview, Shannon N. Green, director and senior fellow of HRI, will moderate an expert panel to assess the impact of religion on foreign policy over the decade since the report's release.

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A Lens on the Afghan War
Oct
30
6:00 PM18:00

A Lens on the Afghan War

New America is hosting Louie Palu and Finbarr O’Reilly, for a discussion on each of their new photography books, Front Towards Enemy and Shooting Ghosts, that capture the experience of the war in Afghanistan through various perspectives. They will discuss their latest works and the experience of wartime photography. 

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A Conversation with His Excellency Pierre Bouassi, Minister of Social Affairs, The Republic of Lebanon
Oct
11
10:00 AM10:00

A Conversation with His Excellency Pierre Bouassi, Minister of Social Affairs, The Republic of Lebanon

Lebanon is home to the highest number of refugees per capita, hosting approximately 1.5 million refugees in a country of only 6 million people. The country’s weak infrastructure, challenging economic conditions, and the growing radicalization of youth and refugees place a heavy burden on the Lebanese state. In addition, the rise of tensions between refugees and their host communities are affecting the country’s fragile sectarian balance and increasing insecurity in the region. The Wilson Center is welcoming Minister Bouassi to address these and other issues.

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Resisting War: How Communities Protect Themselves
Oct
2
3:00 PM15:00

Resisting War: How Communities Protect Themselves

Amid warfare worldwide, unarmed civilians attempt protests or negotiations with combatants to protect their communities from violence. These citizens defy the culture of fear that armed groups enforce, and risk retribution. New research highlights how communities use cohesion and social structures to non-violently influence armed groups—a capacity that governments and institutions often fail to recognize. On October 2, join USIP to discuss such community self-protection, and how policymaking might better support it in conflict zones such as in Syria or Afghanistan.

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Rethinking Political Islam
Sep
25
5:30 PM17:30

Rethinking Political Islam

The rapid succession of events of the past four years have challenged conventional wisdom on political Islam. In “Rethinking Political Islam” (Oxford University Press, 2017), Shadi Hamid and William McCants have gathered together the leading specialists in the field to examine how Islamist movements around the world are rethinking some of the their basic assumptions. On September 25, Graeme Wood of The Atlantic and Kristin Diwan of the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington will join Hamid and McCants for a panel discussion on the book’s findings and conclusions. 

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The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World
Sep
12
12:15 PM12:15

The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World

On a summer afternoon in 1928, world leaders assembled in Paris to outlaw war. Within a year, the treaty signed that day, known as the Peace Pact, was ratified by nearly every state in the world. War, for the first time in history, had become illegal. Within a decade, the states that signed the pact were again at war, and as a result many dismissed the pact as folly. 

In their new book The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World, Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro argue that this dismissal was mistaken, and that the pact ushered in a sustained march towards peace. While doing so, they tell the history of how the pact came to be and of the lawyers, politicians, and intellectuals whose ideas have shaped our understanding of war’s role in a just world order. 

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An Untold Story: The Role of Women in Art & Peacebuilding in the Middle East
Sep
7
12:00 PM12:00

An Untold Story: The Role of Women in Art & Peacebuilding in the Middle East

The Middle East Institute's (MEI) Arts and Culture Program is hosting a panel conversation examining the critical role Middle Eastern women play in building more stable and tolerant communities through the lens of the arts.
 
The panel is in conjunction with programming around I AM, an exhibition of 31 Middle Eastern women contemporary artists from 12 countries, at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, with a general public opening reception on September 9.

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Religious Majoritarianism on the Subcontinent: Impacts on Domestic Tranquility and Regional Security
Jul
27
12:30 PM12:30

Religious Majoritarianism on the Subcontinent: Impacts on Domestic Tranquility and Regional Security

The Stimson Center is hosting a luncheon panel discussion on religious majoritarianism in India and Pakistan and its potential impact on domestic politics and regional stability. This will be a candid discussion with four eminent scholars in this area. Sameer Lalwani will serve as moderator.

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The Anatomy of a Crisis: On the Ground in Venezuela
Jul
25
9:30 AM09:30

The Anatomy of a Crisis: On the Ground in Venezuela

To help understand the complex, rapidly-shifting situation and share an on-the-ground perspective from Caracas, the Inter-American Dialogue is welcoming Phil Gunson—a senior analyst with the International Crisis Group and a 40-year veteran reporting in Latin America—for a frank and wide-ranging exchange on Venezuela today. 

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