Filtering by: ASIA & PACIFIC

Pakistan Elections: What Now?
Aug
8
9:30 AM09:30

Pakistan Elections: What Now?

To discuss the outcome of the elections in Pakistan, the shape of the next government, and the complaints and challenges to the outcome, USIP will hold a conversation with senior representatives from Pakistan’s top three political parties (PTI, PML-N and the Pakistan Peoples Party) via Skype along with experts Daniel Markey, Kiran Pervez and Moeed Yusuf. Join the conversation on Twitter with #PkElectionsWhatNow.

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How Imran Khan Might Change Pakistan and its U.S. Relations
Aug
3
12:00 PM12:00

How Imran Khan Might Change Pakistan and its U.S. Relations

Many anticipate that as the new prime minister, Imran Khan will change Pakistan and alter its relations with the United States and regional powers. A distinguished panel of experts on Pakistan hosted by the Middle East Institute (MEI) will discuss the issues surrounding his leadership. The panelists are Michael Kugelman (Wilson Center), Arif Rafiq (Cizier Consulting), Tamanna Salikuddin (U.S. Institute of Peace) and Moeed Yusuf (U.S. Institute of Peace). MEI’s director for Afghanistan and Pakistan Studies, Marvin Weinbaumwill moderate.

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ROK-U.S. Strategic Forum 2018: Assessing the Trump-Kim Summit
Jun
18
9:00 AM09:00

ROK-U.S. Strategic Forum 2018: Assessing the Trump-Kim Summit

CSIS is hosting a timely discussion with scholars, experts, opinion leaders, and government officials from the United States and South Korea who will participate in a series of panel discussions focused on the historic inter-Korean and U.S.-North Korean summit meetings, the potential for denuclearization and building a peace regime on the Korean peninsula, and regional implications of summit diplomacy for Northeast Asia.

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Understanding Secessionist Struggle in South Asia
May
14
11:00 AM11:00

Understanding Secessionist Struggle in South Asia

Since 1945, much of the world’s conflict has been separatist in nature. South Asia is especially prone to such disputes. At this event, Dr. Ahsan Butt, drawing on his new book, Secession and Security: Explaining State Strategy Against Separatists, will argue that it is states, rather than separatists, that determine how much violence there is in these conflicts. He will highlight the various strategies, ranging from negotiated concessions to large-scale repression, adopted by states in response to separatist movements. Dr. Butt’s deep historical approach focuses on two main cases—Pakistani reactions to Bengali and Baluch demands for independence in the 1970s, and India’s responses to secessionist movements in Kashmir, Punjab, and Assam in the 1980s and 1990s. His presentation will also relate his research to the current situations in Kashmir and Baluchistan.

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An update on the war in Afghanistan
Mar
30
10:00 AM10:00

An update on the war in Afghanistan

Foreign Policy at Brookings is hosting Brigadier General Roger B. Turner, Jr., recently back from a tour in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, to discuss the current state of the conflict there. After opening remarks from General Turner, Brookings Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon will pose several questions to the general.

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Can Economic Interventions Reduce Violence? New Evidence from Kandahar
Feb
16
9:30 AM09:30

Can Economic Interventions Reduce Violence? New Evidence from Kandahar

Reducing violence and preventing the growth of violent movements are perennial challenges for the international community and the role of economic interventions has long been debated. New American is hosting a discussion around the new report from Mercy Corps and the Political Violence FieldLab at Yale University which brings new evidence to the debate based on a randomized controlled trial in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province. Can youth employment programs and cash transfers make a difference?

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U.S. National Security and the Korean Peninsula: Perspectives from a Defector, a Russian, and an Analyst
Feb
14
1:00 PM13:00

U.S. National Security and the Korean Peninsula: Perspectives from a Defector, a Russian, and an Analyst

The Wilson Center is hosting a discussion on U.S. national security and the Korean peninsula from the perspectives of a former senior ranking official of the Kim Jong-un regime, a professor of St Petersburg University, and a renowned author on issues related to North Korea at a conference hosted jointly with the Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS).

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Secession and Security: How States Handle Separatists in South Asia and Beyond
Feb
13
12:15 PM12:15

Secession and Security: How States Handle Separatists in South Asia and Beyond

South Asian countries have experienced a variety of secessionist movements challenging their borders since gaining independence, from the Bengali movement in Pakistan to the Kashmiri movement in India. The Stimson Center is pleased to host Ahsan Butt, Assistant Professor at George Mason University and Nonresident Fellow at the Stimson Center, to discuss his recently published book, Secession and Security: Explaining State Strategy Against Separatists, in which he argues that states, rather than separatists, determine how violent the conflict between them will be. He investigates the strategies, ranging from negotiated concessions to large-scale repression, adopted by states in response to separatist movements.

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Directorate S: America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan
Feb
9
3:50 PM15:50

Directorate S: America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan

New America is hosting a conversation around Directorate S: The CIA and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Steve Coll. He provides a detailed telling of this clash, expanding upon his first book, Ghost Wars, to tell the story of the United States’ efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the years that followed. 

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The Strategic Significance of the South China Sea: American, Asian, and International Perspectives
Feb
1
9:00 AM09:00

The Strategic Significance of the South China Sea: American, Asian, and International Perspectives

The Hudson Institute will host a high-level symposium to discuss the new strategic significance of the South China Sea for Asian and American national interests. In particular, the speakers will examine the origins and geopolitical, economic, and military implications of China’s aggressive strategy in the South China Sea, and consider potential counter strategies that other nations, including the United States, might pursue to preserve and protect peace and stability throughout the region.

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U.S. Responses to the North Korean Threat: A Conversation with Senator Ted Cruz
Jan
24
2:30 PM14:30

U.S. Responses to the North Korean Threat: A Conversation with Senator Ted Cruz

Senator Ted Cruz, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee’s Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, has introduced several pieces of legislation to address the threats emanating from North Korea. Senator Cruz will offer remarks on the latest North Korean threats and how the United States is responding. He will provide insights into what else the United States could and should do to provide maximum protection for the American people.

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Crashback: The Power Clash Between the U.S. and China in the Pacific
Jan
18
11:00 AM11:00

Crashback: The Power Clash Between the U.S. and China in the Pacific

The Heritage Foundation is hosting a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist Michael Fabey. Fabey contests that there war taking place in the Pacific Ocean - a “warm war,” a shoving match between the United States and China. In Crashback, Fabey describes how every year the U.S. is “losing sea.” He predicts the next great struggle between military superpowers will play out in the Pacific, and his book is a preview of how that conflict might unfold.

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NATO's Maritime Frontier: A View from NATO's Maritime Command
Jan
17
2:00 PM14:00

NATO's Maritime Frontier: A View from NATO's Maritime Command

In a conversation with retired Admiral Mark Ferguson, former Commander of US Naval Forces Europe, Africa, and NATO’s JFC-Naples, Vice Admiral Clive Johnstone will provide an update on NATO’s naval operations and exercises, the evolving security environment and the return of the Russian navy, MARCOM's role in enhancing deterrence, NATO cooperation with EU missions, the range of maritime challenges across Europe, and will discuss the way forward in reconstructing Alliance sea power to respond to competition, deter aggression, and to project stability.

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Winning the Third World: The Sino-American Rivalry
Dec
4
11:00 AM11:00

Winning the Third World: The Sino-American Rivalry

In his new book Winning the Third World, Gregg Brazinsky illuminates the competition between the United States and China in 21st-century Asia and Africa by analyzing the Sino-American rivalry during the Cold War. Foreign Affairs has called the book “Essential reading for anyone interested in the future of U.S.-Chinese relations.” CSIS is hosting an event for a discussion with the author.

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The Civilian Elements of the New U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan
Nov
8
3:00 PM15:00

The Civilian Elements of the New U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan

The Atlantic Council’s South Asia Center is hosting a panel discussion on the civilian elements of the new U.S. strategy for Afghanistan, including the reform process, internal politics, economics, and how the Afghan government plans to deliver on its pledges. 

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Hearing: The President’s Plan for Afghanistan and Pakistan: Objectives and Resources
Nov
8
10:00 AM10:00

Hearing: The President’s Plan for Afghanistan and Pakistan: Objectives and Resources

  • Rayburn House Office Building , Room 2172 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The U.S. House of Representatives House Foreign Affairs Committee Subcommittees on the Middle East & North Africa and Asia & the Pacific are holding a joint Subcommittee Hearing on the objectives and resources for Trump's plans in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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India's Responses to the Complex Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar
Nov
6
12:00 PM12:00

India's Responses to the Complex Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar

The latest round of the massive refugee outflow of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar into Bangladesh has created a humanitarian crisis and outrage among the international community. India’s response to the Rohingya issue is conditioned predominantly by its security concerns. The East West Center is hosting Dr. Ghoshal, who will discuss the various strands and stakeholders of India’s response and perspectives on the complex Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar.

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How Do You Solve a Problem Like North Korea?
Nov
6
10:00 AM10:00

How Do You Solve a Problem Like North Korea?

What are the implications of North Korea’s recent gains in nuclear and missile capabilities for the future of U.S. strategy toward North Korea? What is the state of North Korea’s nuclear weapons and ballistic missile technologies? What are the prospects of diplomatic negotiations with Pyongyang? Should the United States pursue a different strategy toward North Korea in light of Pyongyang’s improving nuclear capabilities, perhaps including revising its alliance with South Korea? The Cato Institute will host two panels and a keynote address by former governor Bill Richardson to examine these critical questions.

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The North Korean Nuclear Challenge and International Response
Oct
19
3:00 PM15:00

The North Korean Nuclear Challenge and International Response

The Heritage Foundation is hosting a Joint International Symposium of the Institute of National Security Strategy (Seoul) for a discussion by U.S. and South Korean experts who will discuss the need for stronger bilateral relations in times of turmoil, the foreign policy of the South Korean Moon Jae-in Administration, and the policy options for sanctions and financial pressure.

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Afghanistan Going Forward: Surge, Negotiate, or Get Out?
Oct
10
10:30 AM10:30

Afghanistan Going Forward: Surge, Negotiate, or Get Out?

Sixteen years ago, the United States initiated combat operations in Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Goals have changed marginally over the years, but they typically include defeating al Qaeda and other terrorist groups with global reach, strengthening the Afghan government and security forces to prevent the Taliban from retaking political power, and denying terrorists a safe haven. Can a mini-surge reasonably achieve these or lesser goals? What costs and benefits are associated with a modest surge or the other potential policy choices, such as a negotiated settlement or completely removing U.S. military forces? What evidence do the past 16 years offer in support of the various strategies? How will Afghanistan look in another 16 years? Join the Cato Institute for a wide-ranging discussion.

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Sixteen Years and Counting in Afghanistan: What’s Next for America’s Longest War?
Oct
5
10:30 AM10:30

Sixteen Years and Counting in Afghanistan: What’s Next for America’s Longest War?

October marks 16 years since a U.S.-led troop mission entered Afghanistan to eliminate sanctuaries for al-Qaeda and to remove its Taliban hosts from power. Those initial goals were achieved fairly quickly, and yet more than a decade and a half later, American soldiers are still in Afghanistan fighting a seemingly unending war. This event at the Wilson Center will address how we got to where we are today; what the best and worst policies would be moving forward; whether U.S. President Donald Trump’s new Afghanistan strategy can turn the tide of such a long and complicated war, and what the regional ramifications of this strategy could be—particularly in terms of implications for India and Pakistan.

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Weighing Bad Options: Past Diplomacy With North Korea and Alliance Options Today
Sep
18
2:00 PM14:00

Weighing Bad Options: Past Diplomacy With North Korea and Alliance Options Today

The Carnegie Endowment will host two veteran diplomats deeply involved with the last set of intense negotiations with North Korea who will discuss their experiences and consider options in light of today’s dynamics, and will be joined by both U.S. and Japanese experts. Carnegie’s Jim Schoff will moderate.

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India’s Wars
Sep
14
4:30 PM16:30

India’s Wars

  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is hosting a launch for Arjun Subramaniam’s new book, India’s Wars, which delivers a much-needed and timely analysis of the performance of India’s military after independence. Subramaniam will examine the forging of India’s army, navy, and air force through early conflicts with Pakistan and China, and how this evolution positions India in the twenty-first century. He will be joined in conversation by John H. Gill. Carnegie’s Ashley J. Tellis will moderate. A light reception will follow, and books will be available for purchase.

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Non-Traditional Security in Asia: Disaster Response and Cybersecurity in a Time of Rising Challenges and Constrained Resources
Sep
13
9:30 AM09:30

Non-Traditional Security in Asia: Disaster Response and Cybersecurity in a Time of Rising Challenges and Constrained Resources

How will states meet the challenges posed by disaster relief and cybersecurity? What opportunities exist for non-state actors, such as NGO’s and the private sector to play a role? To answer these questions and more, the Asia Programs of FPRI and the Wilson Center have assembled a leading group of experts.

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The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS): Options and Ways to Respond
Aug
21
1:00 PM13:00

The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS): Options and Ways to Respond

The Atlantic Council’s South Asia Center is hosting a discussion on the emerging influence of ISIS activities in South Asia. In a discussion introduced and moderated by Dr. Bharath Gopalaswamy, director of the South Asia Center, Dr.Christine Fair, Javid Ahmad, Jasmine El-Gamal, and Hagar Chemali will discuss how the group operates, how it impacts individual states internally, and how those governments-and the United States-should respond to this growing phenomenon.

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