Mélange du Mercredi: Tackling Weapon Contamination

Mélange du Mercredi: Tackling Weapon Contamination

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: World Red Cross Red Crescent Day, May 5, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: World Red Cross Red Crescent Day, May 5, 2017

On May 8th, we celebrate World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day, an annual celebration of the principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. This year the ICRC in DC will be launching the ICRC Collaborative Platform in partnership with Swissnex Boston. The day marks the birth of Henry Dunant (born 1828), the founder of the ICRC and the recipient of the first Nobel Peace Prize.  In total, as part of the larger Red Cross movement, which includes the ICRC, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and National Societies, we operate in more than 190 countries, with the help of more than 17 million Red Cross and Red Crescent volunteers. In that spirit, in this week’s roundup, we take a look at the work of the Global Red Cross around the world.

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Mélange du Mercredi/Legitimate Targets? Social Construction, International Law and US Bombing

Mélange du Mercredi/Legitimate Targets? Social Construction, International Law and US Bombing

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, reviewer Dr. Dr Bill Boothby looks at Legitimate Targets? Social Construction, International Law and US Bombing. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Nepal Earthquake, Two Years Later, April 28, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Nepal Earthquake, Two Years Later, April 28, 2017

Two years ago this week, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, bringing devastation and heartache to the Himalayan country. This tragic disaster—which was followed by a series of powerful aftershocks— took more than 8,800 lives and damaged or destroyed more than 800,000 homes. The earthquake’s effects were far-reaching: collapsed schools, broken water systems, and lost sources of income among them. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at Nepal’s recovery, two years later, as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.

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Mélange du Mercredi/The Contours of International Prosecutions: As Defined By Facts, Charges and Jurisdiction

 Mélange du Mercredi/The Contours of International Prosecutions: As Defined By Facts, Charges and Jurisdiction

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, reviewer Sarah Swart looks at The Contours of International Prosecutions:As Defined by Facts, Charges and Jurisdiction. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Four Famines, April 21, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Four Famines, April 21, 2017

This week, the ICRC head of Delegation in South Sudan Jürg Eglin visited the Washington office and gave us a unique from-the-field perspective of the dire situation that nearly 20 million people throughout South Sudan, Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen are facing, a crisis that’s being referred to in humanitarian circles as the Four Famines. It’s not from a lack of resources or weather-related drought. As we’ve mentioned before in this roundup, these famines are a result of conflict, and conditions continue to worsen. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at the four famines as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.

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Mélange du Mercredi/Humanitarian Work Psychology & the Global Development Agenda

Mélange du Mercredi/Humanitarian Work Psychology & the Global Development Agenda

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, reviewers Ashley J. Hoffmanand Drew B. Mallory look at Humanitarian Work Psychology & the Global Development Agenda. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: ICRC Statements on Syrian Missile Strikes, April 7, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: ICRC Statements on Syrian Missile Strikes, April 7, 2017

Late Thursday, the United States launched 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at the Syrian military airfield in Ash Sha'irat near Homs. The U.S. President said the attack was a response to the alleged chemical weapons use in Idlib earlier this week. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at ICRC’s statement on the event as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.

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Mélange du Mercredi/ the Law of Armed Conflict: An Operational Approach

 Mélange du Mercredi/ the Law of Armed Conflict: An Operational Approach

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, reviewer Jamie A. Williamson looks at The Law of Armed Conflict: An Operational Approach. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Conflict at the Root of Famine, March 24, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Conflict at the Root of Famine, March 24, 2017

This week, ICRC Director-General Yves Daccord testified before the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the global state of humanitarian affairs. During the hearing, Daccord focused on the urgent need for humanitarian efforts worldwide, but especially in four of the most severely affected countries: South SudanSomaliaNigeria, and Yemen. The humanitarian situation is now verging on catastrophic and in all four countries, the crises are man-made, experiencing years of years of violence and suffering. Protracted conflict lies at the root of these humanitarian crises. For this week’s roundup, we take a look at some of the conversations and discussions happening around protracted conflict at the root of famine as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.

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Mélange du Mercredi/Droit International Humanitaire

Mélange du Mercredi/Droit International Humanitaire

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week Antoine P. Kabore, Teaching Assistant at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, reviews Droit International Humanitaire. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The People of Syria, Six Years in Crisis, Syria March 17, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The People of Syria, Six Years in Crisis, Syria March 17, 2017

For six years, violence has brought death and destruction to the people of Syria. Millions have been forced from their homes or have fled the country. Eight million Syrians remain displaced within Syria. Five million people live in besieged cities and hard-to-reach areas and 4.8 million Syrians have fled, living as refugees in neighboring countries and beyond. Many of these are the most vulnerable, including children. Since the beginning, in spite of the dangers, the ICRC, alongside the Syrian Arab Red Crescent, has been providing food and life-saving support to Syrians. This year alone, our team in Syria has carried out more than 57 cross frontline operations, bringing food and essential aid to eight million people, and clean water to millions more. And while these statistics are critical, it’s important to remember that behind each of these numbers are individuals, struggling to survive and protect their families and loved ones in the middle of a conflict zone. You can read more stories at SyriaStreet.com. For this week’s roundup, we take a look at some of the conversations and discussions happening around the people living and working in Syria as portrayed by the media and other online outlets. 

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Mélange du Mercredi/International Law and the Classification of Conflicts

Mélange du Mercredi/International Law and the Classification of Conflicts

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, we're looking at International Law and the Classification of Conflict. This review was written by Dr. Roberta Arnold, Fellow, Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, and Professor of International Law, University College London and was originally published in the International Review of the Red Cross: Business Violence and Conflict

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Mélange du Mercredi/Somalia, Traditional Law and IHL

Mélange du Mercredi/Somalia, Traditional Law and IHL

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, we're looking at the case study Somalia, Traditional Law and IHL from the newly launched How Does Law Protect in War Online platform. The platform highlights six among 53 new case studies, including the Somalia case study, allowing professors, students and professionals to explore some of the most salient aspects of IHL in today’s armed conflicts through interactive discussions. 

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Drought in Somalia February 24, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The Drought in Somalia February 24, 2017

While droughts are cyclical in Somalia, last year’s failed rains have exacerbated this year’s conditions, devastating communities dependent on them for their livestock and livelihood. To help those most affected, the ICRC and the Somali Red Crescent Society (SRCS) are currently distributing food to 140,000 drought-affected people, with hopes to reach an additional 10,0000 with cash and other essential items in coming days. The situation is so dire that Sared Haji Jaama, a mother living in a Somali displacement camp responded to a question about conditions, she said "I simply have no words for this drought." For this week’s roundup, we take a look at some of the conversations and discussions happening around the drought in Somalia as portrayed by the media and online outlets.

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Mélange du Mercredi/The Evolution of Warfare

Mélange du Mercredi/The Evolution of Warfare

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, we're looking at the latest edition of the International Review of the Red Cross, The Evolution of Warfare.  We've featured the book reviews contained in this edition in earlier Mélange du Mercredis, but the overall Review itself deserves some attention in light of current discussions. 

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The ICRC in History, February 17, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: The ICRC in History, February 17, 2017

On February 17, 1863, a group of Geneva citizens founded an International Committee for Relief to the Wounded, which later became known as the International Committee of the Red Cross. One hundred and fifty four years later, the ICRC works in nearly 80 countries around the globe. For this week’s roundup, we’re doing something a little different and taking a look at the ICRC’s long and storied history by delving into our archives. 

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Mélange du Mercredi/ Commentary on the First Geneva Convention

Mélange du Mercredi/ Commentary on the First Geneva Convention

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, Jean-Marie Henckaerts shares his experiences of working on the updated Commentary on the First Geneva Convention, published last week and now available Hardback, Paperback and eBook format from Cambridge Press. As always, if you have suggestions, or would like to submit a post on something you feel our readers will also enjoy, we're happy to include them. Just email Editor Niki Clark

 

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Mélange du Mercredi/The Role of National Courts in Applying International Humanitarian Law

Mélange du Mercredi/The Role of National Courts in Applying International Humanitarian Law

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix), our weekly book review courtesy of our friends over at the International Review of the Red Cross. Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading resources and focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, Shane Darcy reviews The Role of National Courts in Applying International Humanitarian Law by Sharon Weill.

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Mélange du Mercredi/Refuge from Inhumanity? War Refugees and International Humanitarian Law

Mélange du Mercredi/Refuge from Inhumanity? War Refugees and International Humanitarian Law

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix), our weekly book review courtesy of our friends over at the International Review of the Red Cross. Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading resources and focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. This week, Sarah Barr reviews Refuge from Inhumanity? War Refugees and International Humanitarian Law, edited by David James Cantor and Jean-François Durieux.

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