Just out! New International Review issue on Human Cost of Detention

 Just out! New International Review issue on Human Cost of Detention

The latest edition of International Review of the Red Cross has been released—Detention: Addressing the human cost.This edition of the International Review of the Red Cross focuses on treatment and conditions in prisons and other places of detention, both in situations of armed conflict and in peacetime. We chose to address this topic in order to highlight the importance of treating detainees with human dignity under all circumstances.Deprivation of liberty carries with it human, social and financial costs that are born by detainees, their families, the detaining authorities and society as a whole. Despite these costs, societies often do not invest in improving prison systems or the infrastructure on which the human dignity of detainees depends.

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The Future of US Detention in Armed Conflict

The Future of US Detention in Armed Conflict

In May 2016, the ICRC’s Washington delegation, Harvard Law School’s PILAC, and the Naval War College’s Stockton Center held their inaugural joint International Humanitarian Law (IHL) workshop on a pressing issue: the future of US detention in armed conflict. About 30 experts, including practitioners and academics from the US and abroad, gathered for two days to discuss, debate and explore the legal intricacies surrounding the detention of foreign nationals during an armed conflict. Read the summary here.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

In the fifth installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne discusses the procedural guarantees in detention. Mr. Hill-Cawthorne is a Lecturer in Law and Programme Director of the LLMs in International Law and Human Rights at the University of Reading. He has a DPhil in International Law from the University of Oxford and his research interests lie in international humanitarian law, human rights law, international criminal law, and relationship of these different areas to general international law.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Rachel VanLandingham on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict:  Rachel VanLandingham on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

In the fifth installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Rachel VanLandingham discusses the procedural guarantees in detention. Professor VanLandingham, Lt. Col., USAF, (ret.), is an associate professor of law at Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, California, and spent four years advising U.S. Central Command officials on detention policies in Iraq and Afghanistan. The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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2016 Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict: A Joint Series

2016 Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict: A Joint Series

Throughout September, in coordination with our friends over at Lawfare and EJIL:Talk!, we’re following up on this summer’s 4th annual Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict (which took place in Oxford in July) with a joint blog series exploring a range of interesting issues relating to the conduct of hostilities – such as targeting “war sustaining” activities and the principle of proportionality, as well as issues related to detention in armed conflict, such as fair trial guarantees and administrative procedures. 

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Stop the insanity: ICRC President warns even wars must have limits

The President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Peter Maurer, is on a mission to get people to sit up and pay attention to the law of armed conflict. Much more importantly, he wants warring parties to fight by the rules – militaries and armed groups alike.

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New “Mandela Rules” Aim to Improve Detainee Treatment

New “Mandela Rules” Aim to Improve Detainee Treatment

Description: A 60-year-old set of rules outlining minimum standards for prisoner treatment have been given an overhaul and a new name following a four-year revision process led by the UN. The ICRC will take part in a panel in DC on July 17 that will examine the reforms, which come at a time when the situation in prisons worldwide appears to be deteriorating. 

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Opinion Piece: Rejecting Torture Is the Right Thing to Do

Opinion Piece: Rejecting Torture Is the Right Thing to Do

As today marks the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, we have chosen to re-post an opinion piece written by ICRC's President, Peter Maurer.  The piece was originally published in the Huffington Post in December 2014.

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