The Geneva Conventions Remain As Relevant As Ever, Part Two

The Geneva Conventions Remain As Relevant As Ever, Part Two

On August 12, 2016 the Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols turned 67 and their relevance—despite violations or claims otherwise—remain as important as ever, if not more so.

Our previous post looked at the development of IHL over the last six decades and the role of the ICRC in its origins. In this post, we examine the current challenges facing the rules of war and on the ICRC's ongoing efforts to ensure that the Conventions continue to stand the test of time.

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The Geneva Conventions Remain As Relevant As Ever

The Geneva Conventions Remain As Relevant As Ever

On August 12th, 2016, the Geneva Conventions--which place limits on how war is waged and form the cornerstone of international humanitarian law (IHL)--turn 67. With civilians bearing the brunt of many protracted conflicts, scholars and aid agencies have raised questions about the continued relevance of IHL.  While the nature of warfare has changed unrecognizably since the adoption of the original convention more than 150 years ago, the rules of IHL remain as relevant as ever. 

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Joint series: Where IHL and IHRL intersect - Part II of Ken Watkin's guest post

Joint series: Where IHL and IHRL intersect - Part II of Ken Watkin's guest post

Throughout the month of September, Intercross, along with two other blogs - Lawfare andEJIL:Talk! - is running a series of articles following up on this summer’s 2nd annual Tansatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict, which took place in Oxford in July. Today, Brigadier General Kenneth "Ken" Watkin brings us the second of a two-part article on the overlap between IHL and IHRL. Ken, who served as a JAG with the Canadian Armed Forces and is an expert on military law, offers his take from a North American perspective. The views expressed in this article are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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