Intensive International Humanitarian Law Course for Humanitarian Practitioners and Policy-Makers

Intensive International Humanitarian Law Course for Humanitarian Practitioners and Policy-Makers

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is organizing an international humanitarian law (IHL) course for humanitarian practitioners, to be held, at ECOGIA, the ICRC's Training Center and at the Humanitarium, the ICRC's conference center, from 23 to 28 September 2018.

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Intercross the Podcast Episode #39: Two Decades Working in Conflict with Mali Head of Delegation Jean-Nicolas Marti

Intercross the Podcast Episode #39: Two Decades Working in Conflict with Mali Head of Delegation Jean-Nicolas Marti

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with the ICRC head of delegation in Mali Jean Nicolas Marti. Marti has worked with ICRC for more than 20 years, in contexts ranging from Gaza and Afghanistan to Lebanon and Central African Republic. In our conversation we discuss the challenges of working in Mali, how the conflict has evolved since the ICRC began working there in 1991, and the strategic importance of a Malian presence, and how he stays motivated after two decades of working in conflict. Hosted by Niki Clark and Sara Owens.

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Intercross the Podcast Episode #38 Twenty Years of the Ottawa Convention: The Policy and Practicality of Ending Anti-Personnel Landmines

Intercross the Podcast Episode #38 Twenty Years of the Ottawa Convention: The Policy and Practicality of Ending Anti-Personnel Landmines

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with Sabrina Henry, Legal and Policy Officer at the ICRC delegation in Ottawa and the Canadian Red Cross and Christoph Harnisch, ICRC head of delegation in Colombia. Twenty years ago, on December 3, 1997, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, typically referred to as the "Ottawa Convention" or "Mine Ban Treaty," was signed. It was entered into force on March 1, 1999. The Convention seeks to end the use of anti-personnel landmines (APLs) worldwide. Our two guests talk about the treaty, the role Canada played in the adoption of the treaty and what it has meant on the ground in Colombia, one of the world’s most heavily mined countries. Hosted by Niki Clark.

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Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, ICRC in Washington’s Deputy Legal Advisor, Andrea Harrison, sits down with three naval warfare experts on why we should be talking about the rules that govern conflict at sea. Professor Julian Ku, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Faculty Director of International Programs at Hofstra University School of Law, Lt Commander Peter Barker of the British Royal Navy and Associate Director for the Law of Coalition Warfare at the Stockton Center for the study of International Law, and Lt Colonel Jeffrey Biller of the U.S. Air Force and military professor at the U.S. Naval War College discuss the looming “hotspots” for naval conflict, the vulnerability of shipwrecked sailors, and how the cyber domain is driving an entirely new set of issues for conduct of naval warfare. Much has changed since the Geneva Conventions were written in 1949 - Where are the most realistic possibilities for a conflict that will be governed by the Second Geneva Convention? What happens when the responsibility to take “all possible measures” to find shipwrecked sailors creates a risk of detection out at sea? Can a vessel be shipwrecked purely through cyber means? Hosted by Andrea Harrison.

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: The obligation to “Ensure Respect” for IHL; The Debate Continues

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: The obligation to “Ensure Respect” for IHL; The Debate Continues

In the first installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Marten Zwanenburg discusses ensuring respect for IHL. Mr. Zwanenburg is the Legal Counsel at the ministry of Foreign Affairs, Netherlands. The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ministry of Foreign Affairs, any other part of the Government of the Netherlands or ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Introduction to a Joint Blog Series

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Introduction to a Joint Blog Series

Over the coming weeks, three blogs - IntercrossEJIL:Talk!, and Lawfare - will host a joint blog symposium on International Law and Armed Conflict. The series will feature posts by some of the participants at the Fifth Annual Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict, which was held at the European University Institute in Florence in late July. As per previous years, the workshop brought together a group of academic, military, and governmental experts from both sides of the Atlantic. The roundtable, held under the Chatham House Rule, was held over two days and examined contemporary questions of international law relating to military operations.

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #28 The Test of Time: Are the 1949 Geneva Conventions Still Relevant?

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #28 The Test of Time: Are the 1949 Geneva Conventions Still Relevant?

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we are joined by ICRC Deputy Legal Advisor Andrea Harrison to discuss the Geneva Conventions of 1949. The first Geneva Convention was signed in 1864, the year after the founding of the ICRC, and it was for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded in Armies in the Field with 57 States Parties.  Most recently, the Geneva Conventions of 1949 were added, in part as a reaction to the tragedies of World War II.  How have the content of the Geneva Conventions changed over time? Every State in the world is party to the Geneva Conventions. What does this say about their significance and importance? And 68 years after the 1949 Conventions, with the nature of conflict radically evolving, are they still relevant and can they still stand the test of time? Hosted by Tracey Begley and Niki Clark. 

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #26 The Legal Frameworks of Self Defense in Armed Conflict with Erica Gaston

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #26 The Legal Frameworks of Self Defense in Armed Conflict with Erica Gaston

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we speak with Erica Gaston, an international lawyer and project manager at the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin, to discuss the legal aspects and humanitarian consequences of the use of self-defense in armed conflict. International humanitarian law addresses the rules for soldiers, armies and States, when they conduct offensive attacks, but it does not directly address the rules governing self-defense. So what are the limits on the use of force when individuals and units are defending themselves in combat situations? Hosted by Niki Clark and Andrea Harrison. 

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The Future of US Detention in Armed Conflict

The Future of US Detention in Armed Conflict

In May 2016, the ICRC’s Washington delegation, Harvard Law School’s PILAC, and the Naval War College’s Stockton Center held their inaugural joint International Humanitarian Law (IHL) workshop on a pressing issue: the future of US detention in armed conflict. About 30 experts, including practitioners and academics from the US and abroad, gathered for two days to discuss, debate and explore the legal intricacies surrounding the detention of foreign nationals during an armed conflict. Read the summary here.

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The Additional Protocols at 40: Upholding Humanity in Today's Conflicts (Webinar)

The Additional Protocols at 40: Upholding Humanity in Today's Conflicts (Webinar)

To mark the 40th Anniversary of the Additional Protocols I and II (APs) on June 8, 2017, the ICRC will convene a conference at the Humanitarium as part of its conference cycle on Generating respect for the law. Historians, lawyers, military officers and diplomats will reflect on the link between humanitarianism and peace, the impact of the APs on the practice of parties to armed conflicts and their practical relevance for today's conflicts. For those outside of Geneva, the conference will be video recorded and posted hereFor more information, go here

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The Updated Commentary on the First Geneva Convention – A New Tool for Generating Respect for International Humanitarian Law

The Updated Commentary on the First Geneva Convention – A New Tool for Generating Respect for International Humanitarian Law

International Law Studies, a journal published by the U.S. Naval War College recently featured an article by ICRC authors, The Updated Commentary on the First Geneva Convention – A New Tool for Generating Respect for International Humanitarian Law. Read the full article here

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Introducing The Second Multi-Blog Series On The Updated Geneva Conventions Commentaries

Introducing The Second Multi-Blog Series On The Updated Geneva Conventions Commentaries

Today, we are launching the second episode of the multi-blog series examining the Geneva Convention Updated Commentaries, focusing on GCI and the arming of military medical personnel, units and transports. To what extent can military medical personnel, units and transports be armed? When permitted, can they be armed with weaponry heavier than the so-called “light” individual weapons? When would this constitute an “act harmful to the enemy”? Which implications does arming them have in terms of the entitlement to display the distinctive emblem of the Conventions? Heather Brandon kicks off the conversation. 

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2016 Joint Series on International Law And Armed Conflict: Janina Dill On Assessing Proportionality

2016 Joint Series on International Law And Armed Conflict: Janina Dill On Assessing Proportionality

In the final installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Janina Dill discusses assessing proportionality. Ms. Dill is a Janina Dill is an Assistant Professor at the Department of International Relations of the London School of Economics and a Research Associate of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict at the University of Oxford. The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

In the fifth installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne discusses the procedural guarantees in detention. Mr. Hill-Cawthorne is a Lecturer in Law and Programme Director of the LLMs in International Law and Human Rights at the University of Reading. He has a DPhil in International Law from the University of Oxford and his research interests lie in international humanitarian law, human rights law, international criminal law, and relationship of these different areas to general international law.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Rachel VanLandingham on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict:  Rachel VanLandingham on Procedural Guarantees in Detention

In the fifth installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Rachel VanLandingham discusses the procedural guarantees in detention. Professor VanLandingham, Lt. Col., USAF, (ret.), is an associate professor of law at Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, California, and spent four years advising U.S. Central Command officials on detention policies in Iraq and Afghanistan. The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Ian Park on the Obligation to Investigate IHL Violations

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Ian Park on the Obligation to Investigate IHL Violations

In the fourth installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Ian Parks discusses the obligation to investigate violations of IHL. Commander Ian Park has served in 7 ships and deployed worldwide in support of the Royal Navy and has deployed as a legal adviser to the ISAF Joint Command, Kabul, Afghanistan in 2011-12, and on numerous occasions to the Middle East. He regularly lectures at universities and military academies. Ian is a graduate of Oxford University, and is, or has been, a Hudson Fellow at Oxford University, a visiting fellow at Harvard Law School, and a First Sea Lord's Fellow.. The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the ICRC or the other blogs taking part in this series.

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2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Chris Jenks on Coalition Operations & the Obligation to Investigate IHL Violations

2016 Joint Series on International Law and Armed Conflict: Chris Jenks on Coalition Operations & the Obligation to Investigate IHL Violations

In the third installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Chris Jenks discusses Coalition Operations and the Obligation to Investigate IHL Violations. Mr. Jenks is an assistant professor of law and directs the criminal justice clinic at the SMU Dedman School of Law in Dallas, Texas. Chris’ research interests focus on accountability norms during armed conflict. 

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