Intercross the Podcast/Episode #36 Pushed to the Limit: Healthcare in Conflict with Esperanza Martinez

Intercross the Podcast/Episode #36 Pushed to the Limit: Healthcare in Conflict with Esperanza Martinez

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with Esperanza Martinez, the ICRC’s Head of Health. Esperanza, who is based at the ICRC HQ in Geneva, Switzerland, has spent most of her life working in the health sector in the humanitarian sphere. She has brought her expertise all over the world, but most recently to Washington, DC to speak with other influential actors on a variety of challenges facing the health sector today, many of which take a heavy toll on communities affected by armed conflict and violence – the devastating and ongoing cholera outbreak in Yemen, the deterioration of public health services due to prolonged conflict, and the psychosocial effects of violence, displacement and gender-based violence, especially on women and children. In this episode, Esperanza helps us break down some of the complexities related to health and health systems and brings us back to the importance of one of the most basic aspects of our humanity. Hosted by Sara Owens and Anna Nelson.

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Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, ICRC in Washington’s Deputy Legal Advisor, Andrea Harrison, sits down with three naval warfare experts on why we should be talking about the rules that govern conflict at sea. Professor Julian Ku, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Faculty Director of International Programs at Hofstra University School of Law, Lt Commander Peter Barker of the British Royal Navy and Associate Director for the Law of Coalition Warfare at the Stockton Center for the study of International Law, and Lt Colonel Jeffrey Biller of the U.S. Air Force and military professor at the U.S. Naval War College discuss the looming “hotspots” for naval conflict, the vulnerability of shipwrecked sailors, and how the cyber domain is driving an entirely new set of issues for conduct of naval warfare. Much has changed since the Geneva Conventions were written in 1949 - Where are the most realistic possibilities for a conflict that will be governed by the Second Geneva Convention? What happens when the responsibility to take “all possible measures” to find shipwrecked sailors creates a risk of detection out at sea? Can a vessel be shipwrecked purely through cyber means? Hosted by Andrea Harrison.

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The ICRC in DC is Hiring an Organization of American States Intern

The ICRC in DC is Hiring an Organization of American States Intern

The ICRC in Washington is hiring an Organization of American States Intern. Must have an excellent command of Advanced Business English and Advanced Business Spanish. Please note: Motivation letters and resumes should be sent to lmacabrey@icrc.org. The closing date for applications is November 20.

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #34 Behind the Lens: Witness to War in Afghanistan with Photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O'Reilly

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #34 Behind the Lens: Witness to War in Afghanistan with Photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O'Reilly

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we are excited to add another iteration to our cultural series, where we explore the intersection of culture and conflict. In this episode, we sit down with war photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O’Reilly. Palu’s works have been featured in the New York Times, BBC and Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. He recently released Front Towards Enemy, a book which examines the five years he spent covering the war in Kandahar, Afghanistan. O’Reilly is currently London-based, having spent 12 years in Central and West Africa as a photographer for Reuters. His book, Shooting Ghosts, is a memoir co-written with retired USMC Sgt. Thomas James Brennan and reflects on the experiences of the war and the unlikely friendship they formed. In this podcast they discuss issues like: How do we consume and engage with images of war? What are the psychological and emotional costs of war for those who photograph conflict? How can photography change the perception that people have of war? Why is this visual documentation important? What is the role of journalists as independent witnesses to war? And how does rocker Henry Rollins represent--for at least one of our guests--how social media and connection has changed the playing field? Hosted by Sara Owens. 

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Mélange du Mercredi: Fighting Together

Mélange du Mercredi: Fighting Together

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. Recently ICRC's Humanitarian Law & Policy Blog featured a two-part blog post introducing the topic of State support to one or more of the Parties to an armed conflict and the implications regarding IHL. 

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #33 Policy and Peacekeeping in South Sudan with Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #33 Policy and Peacekeeping in South Sudan with Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with ICRC in Washington’s Deputy Head of Communications Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink, the Center for Civilians in Conflict Peacekeeping Advisor. Trevor recently returned from a brief mission to South Sudan and Lauren is headed out to the country this week. We took the opportunity to chat with them both about the current challenges facing aid worker and peacekeepers. What are some of the protection issues? Are aid organizations able to secure humanitarian access? And as the largest donor to South Sudan (is that true)—the US has spent nearly $10 billion since independence 6 years ago and pays more than a quarter of all international aid to the country each year—what does the current U.S. policy review for its approach to South Sudan mean for the situation on the ground?

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Foreign Fighters October 27, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Foreign Fighters October 27, 2017

Rhetoric that “dehumanizes” and “demonizes” the enemy or suggests that a particular adversary is “outside the bounds of humanity” and can be treated “as if humanitarian law doesn’t apply” is highly concerning, ICRC’s Deputy Director for the Middle East Patrick Hamilton told reporters this week. Hamilton was speaking at a news conference on the issue of foreign fighters and their families leaving Iraq and Syria. Such language, which could appear to justify war crimes or illegal treatment of detainees, has become more common on all sides of the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at the discussion around foreign fighters, as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.**

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Through the Eyes of Children: Buzzfeed Features ICRC Photography Project in Nigeria

Through the Eyes of Children: Buzzfeed Features ICRC Photography Project in Nigeria

Life in the creekside community of Prison Waterfront, in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, can be as difficult as its name alludes. Here, children grow up amid a tangle of shanty homes with little to no access to basic human necessities such as clean drinking water and sewage systems. Living among widespread litter, human waste, and nearby oil slicks means living off the land simply isn't an option here. To better understand the livelihoods of its residents, the International Committee of the Red Cross handed out disposable cameras to 26 youngsters in Prison Waterfront, asking them to document their daily lives in an effort to better comprehend their living situations.

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Violence in Mogadishu October 20, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Violence in Mogadishu October 20, 2017

Last weekend, a truck bombing went off in the center of Somalia’s capital city of Mogadishu, killing hundreds of civilians. In a Guardian article, reporter Jason Burke called the scale of the attack made it ‘one of the most lethal terrorist acts anywhere in the world for many years.’ The ICRC and the Somalia Red Crescent Society both immediately responded, treating the wounded, supplying medical kits and body bags and supporting relief operations. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at the situation in Somalia, as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.**

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Mélange du Mercredi: Autonomous Weapon Systems and Ethics

Mélange du Mercredi: Autonomous Weapon Systems and Ethics

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. Recently ICRC's Humanitarian Law & Policy Blog begin a mini-series on autonomous weapon systems and ethics. In August of 2017, the ICRC convened a small group of independent experts to discuss this subject. Held under the Chatham House Rule, the aim of the discussion was to take stock of the main ethical issues raised by autonomous weapon systems and to consider the ethical underpinnings of any requirement for human control over weapon systems and the use of force in armed conflict. A blog series will follow, the intro is here. 

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Wounded and Sick and the Proportionality Assessment

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Wounded and Sick and the Proportionality Assessment

In the final installment of our Transatlantic Dialogue Series, Jann K. Kleffner discusses the wounded, sick and the proportionality assessment. Mr. Kleffner is Professor of International Law and Head of the Centre for International and Operational Law at the Swedish Defence University. His research is on public international law, with a special focus on the international law of military operations, including the law of armed conflict and peace operations, jus ad bellum, international criminal law, and human rights law.

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ICRC Panels on Law of Naval Warfare, Military Commissions at International Law Weekend in NYC October 20-21, 2017

ICRC Panels on Law of Naval Warfare, Military Commissions at International Law Weekend in NYC October 20-21, 2017

The American Branch of the International Law Association (ABILA) and the International Law Students Association (ILSA) is hosting their annual International Law Weekend (ILW) conference in New York City from October 19-21, 2017. Theevent brings together hundreds of practitioners, law professors, members of governmental and non-governmental organizations, and students. The theme of ILW 2017 is “International Law in Challenging Times.” For our NYC-based readers, there will be two panels featuring ICRC speakers. The full schedule is available here. Register here

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Mélange du Mercredi: War in Cities; How to Treat the Disease without Killing the Patient

Mélange du Mercredi: War in Cities; How to Treat the Disease without Killing the Patient

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. Recently ICRC's Humanitarian Law & Policy Blog published an analysis by Editor Vincent Bernard on the key rules of IHL that can provide critical guidance in the preparation of future urban operations. It also explores the main challenges in the application of these rules.

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Wounded and Sick, Proportionality, and Armaments

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Wounded and Sick, Proportionality, and Armaments

The fourth post in our joint blog series arising from the 2017 Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict, Wounded and Sick, Proportionality, and Armaments by Geoffrey Corn (South Texas College of Law) is now available over on Lawfare.

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: ICRC Commentary of Common Article 3; Some questions relating to organized armed groups and the applicability of IHL

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: ICRC Commentary of Common Article 3; Some questions relating to organized armed groups and the applicability of IHL

The third post in our joint blog series arising from the 2017 Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict, ‘ICRC Commentary of Common Article 3: Some questions relating to organized armed groups and the applicability of IHL’’- by Annyssa Bellal (Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law & Human Rights) is now available over on EJIL:Talk!

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Online Launch of the International Review of the Red Cross - War and security at sea

Online Launch of the International Review of the Red Cross - War and security at sea

International Review of the Red Cross has just launched its new edition on "War and security at sea". This issue of the Review addresses not only the IHL considerations related to armed conflict at sea, but also the role of bodies of law such as the law of the sea, the law of neutrality and human rights law, as many of today's maritime operations are related to law enforcement or to humanitarian assistance.

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Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Common Article 3 and Linkages Between Non-State Armed Groups

Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict: Common Article 3 and Linkages Between Non-State Armed Groups

The second post in our joint blog series arising from the 2017 Transatlantic Workshop on International Law and Armed Conflict, ‘Common Article 3 and Linkages Between Non-State Armed Groups’- by Ashley Deeks (University of Virginia School of Law) is now available over on Lawfare. Read a teaser here. 

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