Intercross the Podcast Episode #39: Two Decades Working in Conflict with Mali Head of Delegation Jean-Nicolas Marti

Intercross the Podcast Episode #39: Two Decades Working in Conflict with Mali Head of Delegation Jean-Nicolas Marti

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with the ICRC head of delegation in Mali Jean Nicolas Marti. Marti has worked with ICRC for more than 20 years, in contexts ranging from Gaza and Afghanistan to Lebanon and Central African Republic. In our conversation we discuss the challenges of working in Mali, how the conflict has evolved since the ICRC began working there in 1991, and the strategic importance of a Malian presence, and how he stays motivated after two decades of working in conflict. Hosted by Niki Clark and Sara Owens.

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Reflections from Myanmar: Intercross Interviews ICRC Head of Delegation Fabrizio Carboni

Reflections from Myanmar: Intercross Interviews ICRC Head of Delegation Fabrizio Carboni

Intercross recently caught up with ICRC Head of Delegation in Myanmar Fabrizio Carboni to discuss the political crisis there and the more than half a million who have fled to Bangladesh since the end of August. To learn more about the ICRC's work in Myanmar, go here

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Intercross the Podcast Episode #38 Twenty Years of the Ottawa Convention: The Policy and Practicality of Ending Anti-Personnel Landmines

Intercross the Podcast Episode #38 Twenty Years of the Ottawa Convention: The Policy and Practicality of Ending Anti-Personnel Landmines

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with Sabrina Henry, Legal and Policy Officer at the ICRC delegation in Ottawa and the Canadian Red Cross and Christoph Harnisch, ICRC head of delegation in Colombia. Twenty years ago, on December 3, 1997, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, typically referred to as the "Ottawa Convention" or "Mine Ban Treaty," was signed. It was entered into force on March 1, 1999. The Convention seeks to end the use of anti-personnel landmines (APLs) worldwide. Our two guests talk about the treaty, the role Canada played in the adoption of the treaty and what it has meant on the ground in Colombia, one of the world’s most heavily mined countries. Hosted by Niki Clark.

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No Direction Home: The Personal Stories of Missing Migrants

No Direction Home: The Personal Stories of Missing Migrants

The ICRC has launched a new interactive website – missingmigrants.icrc.org – featuring the stories and photos behind the humanitarian tragedies of those who go missing along migration routes. Their journeys are long and dangerous; across the Mediterranean, the Maghreb, the Central American corridor. People fleeing violence and scarcity, migrating to stay alive just one more day. These stories are just one part of this global issue: they are the stories of those who left to find a better life, but never arrived. Check out the site here.

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #37 How Women are Helping Shape the World's First Humanitarian Impact Bond with Kimberly Gire and Jyl Strong

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #37 How Women are Helping Shape the World's First Humanitarian Impact Bond with Kimberly Gire and Jyl Strong

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast,

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with Kimberly Gire, founder of the Global Women Leaders and Jyl Strong, ICRC in Washington’s Policy Advisor. They talk about how through the Global Women Leaders, women bankers, among other professions, have brought their unique skill sets to support humanitarian efforts around the globe. They also discuss the power and drive that comes from women joining together, how ICRC is looking into ways to utilize innovative financing tools, including the world's first humanitarian impact bond recently launched by the ICRC, and stories from Kimberly’s recent trip to Lebanon. Hosted by Niki Clark.

 

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Intercross the Podcast/Episode #36 Pushed to the Limit: Healthcare in Conflict with Esperanza Martinez

Intercross the Podcast/Episode #36 Pushed to the Limit: Healthcare in Conflict with Esperanza Martinez

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with Esperanza Martinez, the ICRC’s Head of Health. Esperanza, who is based at the ICRC HQ in Geneva, Switzerland, has spent most of her life working in the health sector in the humanitarian sphere. She has brought her expertise all over the world, but most recently to Washington, DC to speak with other influential actors on a variety of challenges facing the health sector today, many of which take a heavy toll on communities affected by armed conflict and violence – the devastating and ongoing cholera outbreak in Yemen, the deterioration of public health services due to prolonged conflict, and the psychosocial effects of violence, displacement and gender-based violence, especially on women and children. In this episode, Esperanza helps us break down some of the complexities related to health and health systems and brings us back to the importance of one of the most basic aspects of our humanity. Hosted by Sara Owens and Anna Nelson.

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Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

Intercross the Podcast/Episode #35 The “Forgotten Child of IHL”:Why We Should be Talking about the Future of Naval Warfare

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, ICRC in Washington’s Deputy Legal Advisor, Andrea Harrison, sits down with three naval warfare experts on why we should be talking about the rules that govern conflict at sea. Professor Julian Ku, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Faculty Director of International Programs at Hofstra University School of Law, Lt Commander Peter Barker of the British Royal Navy and Associate Director for the Law of Coalition Warfare at the Stockton Center for the study of International Law, and Lt Colonel Jeffrey Biller of the U.S. Air Force and military professor at the U.S. Naval War College discuss the looming “hotspots” for naval conflict, the vulnerability of shipwrecked sailors, and how the cyber domain is driving an entirely new set of issues for conduct of naval warfare. Much has changed since the Geneva Conventions were written in 1949 - Where are the most realistic possibilities for a conflict that will be governed by the Second Geneva Convention? What happens when the responsibility to take “all possible measures” to find shipwrecked sailors creates a risk of detection out at sea? Can a vessel be shipwrecked purely through cyber means? Hosted by Andrea Harrison.

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The ICRC in DC is Hiring an Organization of American States Intern

The ICRC in DC is Hiring an Organization of American States Intern

The ICRC in Washington is hiring an Organization of American States Intern. Must have an excellent command of Advanced Business English and Advanced Business Spanish. Please note: Motivation letters and resumes should be sent to lmacabrey@icrc.org. The closing date for applications is November 20.

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #34 Behind the Lens: Witness to War in Afghanistan with Photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O'Reilly

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #34 Behind the Lens: Witness to War in Afghanistan with Photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O'Reilly

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we are excited to add another iteration to our cultural series, where we explore the intersection of culture and conflict. In this episode, we sit down with war photographers Louie Palu and Finbarr O’Reilly. Palu’s works have been featured in the New York Times, BBC and Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. He recently released Front Towards Enemy, a book which examines the five years he spent covering the war in Kandahar, Afghanistan. O’Reilly is currently London-based, having spent 12 years in Central and West Africa as a photographer for Reuters. His book, Shooting Ghosts, is a memoir co-written with retired USMC Sgt. Thomas James Brennan and reflects on the experiences of the war and the unlikely friendship they formed. In this podcast they discuss issues like: How do we consume and engage with images of war? What are the psychological and emotional costs of war for those who photograph conflict? How can photography change the perception that people have of war? Why is this visual documentation important? What is the role of journalists as independent witnesses to war? And how does rocker Henry Rollins represent--for at least one of our guests--how social media and connection has changed the playing field? Hosted by Sara Owens. 

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Mélange du Mercredi: Fighting Together

Mélange du Mercredi: Fighting Together

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. Recently ICRC's Humanitarian Law & Policy Blog featured a two-part blog post introducing the topic of State support to one or more of the Parties to an armed conflict and the implications regarding IHL. 

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Intercross the Podcast: Episode #33 Policy and Peacekeeping in South Sudan with Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink

Intercross the Podcast: Episode #33 Policy and Peacekeeping in South Sudan with Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink

In this episode of Intercross the Podcast, we sit down with ICRC in Washington’s Deputy Head of Communications Trevor Keck and Lauren Spink, the Center for Civilians in Conflict Peacekeeping Advisor. Trevor recently returned from a brief mission to South Sudan and Lauren is headed out to the country this week. We took the opportunity to chat with them both about the current challenges facing aid worker and peacekeepers. What are some of the protection issues? Are aid organizations able to secure humanitarian access? And as the largest donor to South Sudan (is that true)—the US has spent nearly $10 billion since independence 6 years ago and pays more than a quarter of all international aid to the country each year—what does the current U.S. policy review for its approach to South Sudan mean for the situation on the ground?

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Foreign Fighters October 27, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Foreign Fighters October 27, 2017

Rhetoric that “dehumanizes” and “demonizes” the enemy or suggests that a particular adversary is “outside the bounds of humanity” and can be treated “as if humanitarian law doesn’t apply” is highly concerning, ICRC’s Deputy Director for the Middle East Patrick Hamilton told reporters this week. Hamilton was speaking at a news conference on the issue of foreign fighters and their families leaving Iraq and Syria. Such language, which could appear to justify war crimes or illegal treatment of detainees, has become more common on all sides of the conflicts in Iraq and Syria. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at the discussion around foreign fighters, as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.**

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Through the Eyes of Children: Buzzfeed Features ICRC Photography Project in Nigeria

Through the Eyes of Children: Buzzfeed Features ICRC Photography Project in Nigeria

Life in the creekside community of Prison Waterfront, in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, can be as difficult as its name alludes. Here, children grow up amid a tangle of shanty homes with little to no access to basic human necessities such as clean drinking water and sewage systems. Living among widespread litter, human waste, and nearby oil slicks means living off the land simply isn't an option here. To better understand the livelihoods of its residents, the International Committee of the Red Cross handed out disposable cameras to 26 youngsters in Prison Waterfront, asking them to document their daily lives in an effort to better comprehend their living situations.

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#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Violence in Mogadishu October 20, 2017

#ICYMI Weekly Roundup: Violence in Mogadishu October 20, 2017

Last weekend, a truck bombing went off in the center of Somalia’s capital city of Mogadishu, killing hundreds of civilians. In a Guardian article, reporter Jason Burke called the scale of the attack made it ‘one of the most lethal terrorist acts anywhere in the world for many years.’ The ICRC and the Somalia Red Crescent Society both immediately responded, treating the wounded, supplying medical kits and body bags and supporting relief operations. In this week’s roundup, we take a look at the situation in Somalia, as portrayed by the media and other online outlets.**

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Mélange du Mercredi: Autonomous Weapon Systems and Ethics

Mélange du Mercredi: Autonomous Weapon Systems and Ethics

Welcome to Mélange du Mercredi (Wednesday Mix). Each week, we highlight one of the latest and greatest in reading, film and other scholarly resources, focusing on a variety of issues pertaining to international humanitarian law. Recently ICRC's Humanitarian Law & Policy Blog begin a mini-series on autonomous weapon systems and ethics. In August of 2017, the ICRC convened a small group of independent experts to discuss this subject. Held under the Chatham House Rule, the aim of the discussion was to take stock of the main ethical issues raised by autonomous weapon systems and to consider the ethical underpinnings of any requirement for human control over weapon systems and the use of force in armed conflict. A blog series will follow, the intro is here. 

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